Speech of Fire

스피치 오브 파이어

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Seoul, South Korea

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“We know what we are, but know not what we may be”

--Ophelia
Hamlet, Act 4 Scene 5

GENERAL

GENERAL

“It is how we choose what we do, and how we approach it, that will determine whether the sum of our days adds up to a formless blur, or to something resembling a work of art.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life

GENERAL

MOVEMENT / GENRAL

“When we choose a goal and invest ourselves in it to the limits of concentration, whatever we do will be enjoyable. And once we have tasted this joy, we will redouble our efforts to taste it again. This is the way the self grows.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

MOVEMENT

MOVEMENT / GENRAL

“When we choose a goal and invest ourselves in it to the limits of concentration, whatever we do will be enjoyable. And once we have tasted this joy, we will redouble our efforts to taste it again. This is the way the self grows.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

MOVMEENT / GUGAK

“A person who has achieved control over psychic energy and has invested it in consciously chosen goals cannot help but grow into a more complex being. By stretching skills, by reaching toward higher challenges, such a person becomes an increasingly extraordinary individual.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

MOVEMENT

“...success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue...as the unintended side-effect of one's personal dedication to a course greater than oneself.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

TEXT CLASS

ACTING SHAKESPEARE'S TEXT:

“The good things in life do not come only through the senses. Some of the most exhilarating experiences we undergo are generated inside the mind, triggered by information that challenges our ability to think, rather than from the use of sensory skills.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

ACTING SHAKESPEARE'S TEXT / SCENES

“The second reason creativity is so fascinating is that when we are involved in it, we feel that we are living more fully than during the rest of life.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention

SCENES CLASS

ACTING SHAKESPEARE'S TEXT / SCENES

“The second reason creativity is so fascinating is that when we are involved in it, we feel that we are living more fully than during the rest of life.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention

SCENES CLASS

“Consuming culture is never as rewarding as producing it.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

SCENES CLASS

“Enjoyment appears at the boundary between boredom and anxiety, when the challenges are just balanced with the person's capacity to act.”― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

GUGAK CLASS

MOVMEENT / GUGAK

“A person who has achieved control over psychic energy and has invested it in consciously chosen goals cannot help but grow into a more complex being. By stretching skills, by reaching toward higher challenges, such a person becomes an increasingly extraordinary individual.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

MOVMEENT / GUGAK

“A person who has achieved control over psychic energy and has invested it in consciously chosen goals cannot help but grow into a more complex being. By stretching skills, by reaching toward higher challenges, such a person becomes an increasingly extraordinary individual.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

GUGAK

“One cannot lead a life that is truly excellent without feeling that one belongs to something greater and more permanent than oneself.”

 ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life

GUGAK

“One cannot lead a life that is truly excellent without feeling that one belongs to something greater and more permanent than oneself.”

 ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life

NOT USING

[SAME AS SHORTENED VERSION ABOVE] “It is when we act freely, for the sake of the action itself rather than for ulterior motives, that we learn to become more than what we were. When we choose a goal and invest ourselves in it to the limits of concentration, whatever we do will be enjoyable. And once we have tasted this joy, we will redouble our efforts to taste it again. This is the way the self grows.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

"“Contrary to what we usually believe, moments like these, the best moments in our lives, are not the passive, receptive, relaxing times—although such experiences can also be enjoyable, if we have worked hard to attain them. The best moments usually occur when a person’s body or mind is stretched to its limits in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile. Optimal experience is thus something that we make happen....For each person there are thousands of opportunities, challenges to expand ourselves.” 

― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

“People who learn to control inner experience will be able to determine the quality of their lives, which is as close as any of us can come to being happy.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

“Of all the virtues we can learn no trait is more useful, more essential for survival, and more likely to improve the quality of life than the ability to transform adversity into an enjoyable challenge.” 
― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Happiness

“it was found that the more often people report reading books, the more flow experiences they claim to have, while the opposite trend was found for watching television.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life

“Although watching TV is far from being a positive experience—generally people report feeling passive, weak, rather irritable, and sad when doing it—at least the flickering screen brings a certain amount of order to consciousness. The predictable plots, familiar characters, and even the redundant commercials provide a reassuring pattern of stimulation. The screen invites attention to itself as a manageable, restricted aspect of the environment. While interacting with television, the mind is protected from personal worries. The information passing across the screen keeps unpleasant concerns out of the mind.” 
― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

“A person can make himself happy, or miserable, regardless of what is actually happening “outside,” just by changing the contents of consciousness. We all know individuals who can transform hopeless situations into challenges to be overcome, just through the force of their personalities. This ability to persevere despite obstacles and setbacks is the quality people most admire in others, and justly so; it is probably the most important trait not only for succeeding in life, but for enjoying it as well.” 
― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

“The mark of a person who is in control of consciousness is the ability to focus attention at will, to be oblivious to distractions, to concentrate for as long as it takes to achieve a goal, and not longer. And the person who can do this usually enjoys the normal course of everyday life.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

“The quality of life does not depend on happiness alone, but also on what one does to be happy. If one fails to develop goals that give meaning to one's existence, if one does not use the mind to its fullest, then good feelings fulfill just a fraction of the potential we possess. A person who achieves contentment by withdrawing from the world to "cultivate his own garden," like Voltaire's Candide, cannot be said to lead an excellent life. Without dreams, without risks, only a trivial semblance of living can be achieved.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life

“Wake up in the morning with a specific goal to look forward to. Creative individuals don’t have to be dragged out of bed; they are eager to start the day. This is not because they are cheerful, enthusiastic types. Nor do they necessarily have something exciting to do. But they believe that there is something meaningful to accomplish each day, and they can’t wait to get started on it. Most of us don’t feel our actions are that meaningful. Yet everyone can discover at least one thing every day that is worth waking up for. It could be meeting a certain person, shopping for a special item, potting a plant, cleaning the office desk, writing a letter, trying on a new dress. It is easier if each night before falling asleep, you review the next day and choose a particular task that, compared to the rest of the day, should be relatively interesting and exciting. Then next morning, open your eyes and visualize the chosen event—play it out briefly in your mind, like an inner videotape, until you can hardly wait to get dressed and get going. It does not matter if at first the goals are trivial and not that interesting. The important thing is to take the easy first steps until you master the habit, and then slowly work up to more complex goals. Eventually most of the day should consist of tasks you look forward to, until you feel that getting up in the morning is a privilege, not a chore.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention

“the phenomenology of enjoyment has eight major components. When people reflect on how it feels when their experience is most positive, they mention at least one, and often all, of the following. First, the experience usually occurs when we confront tasks we have a chance of completing. Second, we must be able to concentrate on what we are doing. Third and fourth, the concentration is usually possible because the task undertaken has clear goals and provides immediate feedback. Fifth, one acts with a deep but effortless involvement that removes from awareness the worries and frustrations of everyday life. Sixth, enjoyable experiences allow people to exercise a sense of control over their actions. Seventh, concern for the self disappears, yet paradoxically the sense of self emerges stronger after the flow experience is over. Finally, the sense of the duration of time is altered; hours pass by in minutes, and minutes can stretch out to seem like hours. The combination of all these elements causes a sense of deep enjoyment that is so rewarding people feel that expending a great deal of energy is worthwhile simply to be able to feel it.” ― Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience